Jump to content

Nkhondo ya ku Sudan 2023

Kufuma Wikipedia
2023 Sudan conflict
Part of the Sudanese transition to democracy

Military situation as of 3 Julayi 2024
   Controlled by the Sudanese Armed Forces
   Controlled by the Rapid Support Forces
(For a more detailed map of the current military situation, see here)
Date15 Epulelo 2023 – present (2023-04-15 – present)
(1 year, 2 months, 2 weeks and 4 days)
Location
Khartoum, Darfur region and other strategic areas in Sudan
Status

Ongoing

Territorial
changes
  • Rapid Support Forces occupy parts of the capital Khartoum and Darfur region, including Khartoum International Airport, Nyala, Kabkabiya, Ed Daein, and Geneina[12][13]
  • Disputed control of key government sites
  • Belligerents
    Rapid Support Forces
    Supported by:
    Libyan National Army[lower-alpha 1]
    Wagner Group[lower-alpha 2] (alleged, denied by RSF and Wagner)[7][8]
    Sudanese Armed Forces
    Supported by:
     Egypt[lower-alpha 3]
    Commanders and leaders
    Sudan Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo Sudan Abdel Fattah al-Burhan
    Strength
    70,000–150,000[14] 110,000–120,000[14]
    Casualties and losses
    200 Egyptian servicemen captured
    At least 559 killed[15] and 4,000 injured[16]

    Nkhondo pakati pa magulu ghakwimikana gha boma la ŵasilikari la Sudan yikamba pa 15 April 2023. Nkhondo iyi yikamba apo nkhondo yikamba kumanjiliro gha dazi kwa Sudan, mu msumba ukuru wa Khartoum, na mu chigaŵa cha Darfur. Pa 25 April, ŵanthu ŵakukwana 559 ŵakakomeka[15] ndipo ŵanyake ŵakujumpha 4,000 ŵakapwetekeka.[16]

    Ukaboni[lemba | kulemba source]

    1. Faucon, Benoit; Said, Summer; Malsin, Jared (19 April 2023). "Libyan Militia and Egypt's Military Back Opposite Sides in Sudan Conflict". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on 19 April 2023. Retrieved 19 April 2023. "Mr. Haftar, who is backed by Russia and the United Arab Emirates, sent at least one shipment of ammunition on Monday (17 April) from Libya to Sudan to replenish supplies for Gen. Dagalo," the people familiar with the matter said.
    2. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named libya-ahram
    3. Faulkner, Christopher (June 2022). Cruickshank, Paul; Hummel, Kristina (eds.). "Undermining Democracy and Exploiting Clients: The Wagner Group's Nefarious Activities in Africa" (PDF). CTC Sentinel. West Point, New York: Combating Terrorism Center. 15 (6): 28–37. Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 July 2022. Retrieved 16 August 2022.
    4. "What is the Wagner Group, Russia's mercenary organisation?". The Economist. ISSN 0013-0613. Retrieved 16 March 2022. "From a legal perspective, Wagner doesn't exist," says Sorcha MacLeod
    5. Elbagir, Nima; Mezzofiore, Gianluca; Qiblawi, Tamara (20 April 2023). "Exclusive: Evidence emerges of Russia's Wagner arming militia leader battling Sudan's army". CNN. Archived from the original on 20 April 2023. Retrieved 20 April 2023. The Russian mercenary group Wagner has been supplying Sudan's Rapid Support Forces (RSF) with missiles to aid their fight against the country's army, Sudanese and regional diplomatic sources have told CNN. The sources said the surface-to-air missiles have significantly buttressed RSF paramilitary fighters and their leader Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo
    6. Schmitt, Eric; Wong, Edward (23 April 2023). "United States Says Wagner Has Quietly Picked Sides in Sudan". The New York Times. Retrieved 25 April 2023. Yevgeny Prigozhin, the founder of the notorious private military company Wagner, has offered weapons to the paramilitaries fighting for control of Sudan, according to American officials.
    7. 7.0 7.1 "Wagner in Sudan: What have Russian mercenaries been up to?". BBC News. 24 April 2023. Its founder, Yevgeny Prighozin – who has close links to President Vladimir Putin – has said that "not a single Wagner PMC [private military company] fighter has been present in Sudan" for over two years. We've found no evidence that Russian mercenaries are currently inside the country. But there is evidence of Wagner's previous activities in Sudan...
    8. "Sudan's Rapid Support Force denies links to Wagner group". Military Africa. 22 April 2023.
    9. Faucon, Benoit; Said, Summer; Malsin, Jared (19 April 2023). "Libyan Militia and Egypt's Military Back Opposite Sides in Sudan Conflict". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 27 April 2023. Egypt...sent jet fighters just before the fighting started and additional pilots soon after to support Gen. Burhan
    10. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named egy1
    11. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named egy2
    12. Sudan: Deadly Sudan Army-RSF Clashes Spark Human Tragedy, Widespread Looting in Darfur Archived 19 Epulelo 2023 at the Wayback Machine, 17 April 2023
    13. Salih, Zeinab (April 16, 2023). "Sudan fighting rages for second day despite UN-proposed ceasefire". Archived from the original on April 16, 2023.
    14. 14.0 14.1 "Sudan: Stalemates rule out one-man victory". DW. 19 April 2023. Archived from the original on 19 April 2023. Retrieved 19 April 2023.
    15. 15.0 15.1 "Sudan ceasefire eases fighting as army denies rumors about deposed dictator Omar al-Bashir's whereabouts". CBS News (in American English). Retrieved 2023-04-26.
    16. 16.0 16.1 "No sign Sudan warring parties ready to 'seriously negotiate': UN". Aljazeera. 26 April 2023. Retrieved 26 April 2023.


    Cite error: <ref> tags exist for a group named "lower-alpha", but no corresponding <references group="lower-alpha"/> tag was found